34th Squadron               Activated 1969

1970

1981

 

 

 

 

       

1970     "Loosehog Thirty-Four"


Description: The patch is a blue-bordered circular emblem with a crimson “razorback hog” centered on a white field. The blue number “34” with three stylized aircraft leaving black contrails is above the animal. Alternating red and white spokes are at the bottom of the patch.

Significance: The razorback hog exemplifies the aggressive manner in which cadets work toward their goals. The royal blue used in the patch represents the tremendous pride that the 34th has in itself and the performance of its duties.

Alternate Significance: The charging razorback depicts the fighting spirit and aggressiveness of the men of the 34th Cadet Squadron. The blue pathways portray the varied career fields which the graduated “Tuskers” will pursue in the operational Air Force. Three stylized aircraft in the background symbolize the future of the USAF and the desire of the cadets to become an integral part of this future. Their diverging contrails in the sky represent freedom of the skies, which the cadets of 34th Squadron, as future officers, hope to maintain.

History: This is the squadron’s original patch.

Nicknames: "Loosehog Thirty-Four"   "Tuskers"   

  1970 – 1981

 

 

The charging razorback depicts the fighting spirit and aggressiveness of the men of the 34th Squadron. On their emblem three stylized aircraft symbolize the future of the Air Force and the desire of the cadets to become an integral part of the future. Sponsored by the 474th Tactical Fighter Wing, Nellis AFB, Nevada, the squadron was formed in 1969 and nicknamed “Loosehog 34.”  – C3C William Johnson, Class of 1976, Falconews, 29 March 1974


 

The charging razorback of the 34th Squadron displays the fighting spirit and aggressiveness shown by its members when beset with great difficulty. The blue pathways represent the varied career fields and opportunities of the cadet. Three stylized aircraft in the background symbolize the future of the United States Air Force and the desire of each cadet to become part of that future.  – 1975 Polaris


1981    "Loosehawgs"


Description: The patch is circular in design and edged in gold. The top half of the background is blue with a white “34” in the upper right. The lower half of the background has alternating red and white stripes that converge to the center of the patch. The patch has a gray A-10 Thunderbolt II in the center and a P-47 Thunderbolt immediately below the A-10. Both aircraft appear to be diving to the left. The patch has a bolt of lightning, which is gold with a white border that extends from the upper left to the lower right. The bolt is being by a gray and purple armored hand. The patch also has the Polaris star immediately below the hand holding the lightning bolt.

Significance: The four dominant colors, gold, blue, silver, and red, represent the different classes at the Air Force Academy. The A-10 represents the modern Air Force and the P-47 serves as a reminder of the rich heritage of the Air Force. Both aircraft are nicknamed “Thunderbolt,” just as the squadron is nicknamed “Thunderbolt.” The Polaris star reminds cadets to always look forward with high goals and ideals. The thunderbolt shows the strength and power of the United States Air Force, and the arm poised to throw the thunderbolt serves as a warning to all potential aggressors that America is ready and willing to use its military might to maintain its freedoms.

History: This is the squadron’s second patch, adopted in 1981, and designed by C2C Tracy M. Murakami, Class of 1983.

Nicknames: "Thunderbolt"   "Loose Hawgs"

  1983 –

 

 

Sketches & Prototypes


 

This sketch is likely a prototype, possibly that submitted for approval. It shows the number "41" on the tail, which the Cadet Uniform Board recommended be changed to "34" prior to production (Document Below). The sketch is signed by C/2C Tracy M. Murakami, CS-19.


 

Documents


         

 

Uniform Board Patch Change Request
1981