23rd Squadron               Activated 1961

1963

1976

1977

2010

 

 

   

1963          "Crash and Burn"


Description: A red, black, and silver shield with the point up is bordered and quartered in silver. A silver-winged knight’s helmet outlined in black rests in a black field in the upper quarter. A Wake or Ormande Knot in silver is in the lower quarter with a black background. The other two quarters are in red. Across the bottom in red letters is “23RD SQUADRON” on a black band.

Significance: The knight’s helmet in profile is the traditional symbol of the esquire and gentleman. The wings represent flight, hence it represents the cadet gentlemen of the Air Force Academy. The knot is symbolic of strength through unity. The threads on the tassels number 23, representing the squadron (six threads on each of three tassels, five on the remaining one). The red is the symbol of valor, typical of the squadron aggressiveness on the athletic field.

History: This was the squadron’s first patch, adopted in 1963.

Nicknames: "Crash and Burn," "Barnstormers."

  1965 – 1976

 

 

The first graduating class for the “Crash and Burn” 23rd came in 1962. Since that time the tradition of the 23rd has grown until today it is recognized throughout the Cadet Wing. The 23rd is sponsored by the 552nd Airborne Early Warning and Control Wing, McClellan AFB, California.  – C3C Thomas Burgie, Class of 1976, Falconews, 29 March 1974


 

A silver-winged knight’s helmet is the dominant symbol for the patch of Twenty-Third squadron. The knight’s helmet is the traditional symbol of the esquire and the gentleman. The wings symbolize flight and the knight’s helmet represents the cadet gentlemen of the United State Air Force Academy. The knot on the patch is symbolic of strength and unity, while the color red is symbolic of valor.  – 1975 Polaris


 

Documents


         

 

Request for Approval 1963

 

 

 

 


1976     "Barnstormers"


Description: The patch is a circular gold and black patch, bordered in black. A World War I aviator known as “Captain Zig-Zag” appears in the center with the words “BARNSTORMIN’ 23” to the aviator’s right.

Significance: The aviator signifies the qualities of courage, patriotism, and daring.

History: This is the squadron’s second patch, adopted in 1976.

Nickname: "Barnstormers"

  1977

 

 

Note: Any resemblance between "Captain Zig-Zag" and the Zig-Zag cigarette papers logo was purely intentional, and likely explains the short life of the patch.


1977     "Barnstormers"


Description: The patch is a circular emblem with a World War I aviator soaring through white clouds in the middle of a sky blue background. The word "BARNSTORMIN'" written in blue, sits at the top of the patch, and the red numeral "23" is at the bottom.

Significance: Red, white, and blue symbolizes the colors of the American flag. The barnstormer represents the spirit and daring of the men who pioneered American commercial and military aviation.

History: This is the squadron's third patch, adopted in 1977, and was designed by Ron Lowe, Class of 1979.

Nickname: "Barnstormers"

  1978 – 2010


1963          "Barnstormers"


Description: A red, black, and silver shield with the point up is bordered and quartered in silver. A silver-winged knight’s helmet outlined in black rests in a black field in the upper quarter. A Wake or Ormande Knot in silver is in the lower quarter with a black background. The other two quarters are in red. Across the bottom in red letters is “23RD SQUADRON” on a black band.

Significance: Named after the daring pioneers of American commercial and military aviation, Squadron 23 cadets aim to achieve the fearlessness of their namesake. The helmet symbolizes strength and honor while the overlapping loops signify the barnstormer’s aerial stunts.

History: This was the squadron’s original patch, adopted in 1963 and readopted in 2010.

Nicknames: "Barnstormers."

  2011 –